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Territorial Acquisitions of the United States

Metadata also available as - [Outline] - [Parseable text] - [XML] - [DIF]

Frequently-anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title: Territorial Acquisitions of the United States
Abstract:
This map layer portrays the major acquisitions of territory by the United States of America. Only areas in North America, the Caribbean, and Hawaii are included. Also shown are areas that were part of the United States at one time but which have been ceded to other countries.
Supplemental_Information:
The United States also includes additional territories not shown in this map layer. The following areas are or have been territories of the United States:

American Samoa <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/asgpage.htm> was acquired under the 1899 Treaty of Berlin between Germany, Great Britain, and the United States. The islands are now an unorganized and unincorporated territory of the United States and are administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior <http://www.doi.gov/>, Office of Insular Affairs <http://www.doi.gov/oia/>.

The Federated States of Micronesia <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/fsmpage.htm> was part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, but in November 1986 became a fully independent country in free association with the United States. While the country is independent, the United States provides defense and some financial assistance, and in return is allowed military use of the islands.

Guam <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/gumpage.htm> became a territory of the United States after the Spanish-American War. Under the December 10, 1898 Treaty of Paris, Spain ceded the island to the United States. Guam was captured by Japan in 1941 but was retaken by the United States in 1944. It became an organized, unincorporated territory of the United States in August, 1950, and is administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior <http://www.doi.gov/>, Office of Insular Affairs <http://www.doi.gov/oia/>.

The Northern Mariana Islands <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/cnmipage.htm> were part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, and became a self-governing United States commonwealth in 1986.

The Republic of the Marshall Islands <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/rmipage.htm> was part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, but in November 1986 became a fully independent republic in free association with the United States. While the country is independent, the United States provides defense and some financial assistance, and in return is allowed military use of the islands.

The Republic of Palau <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/palaupage.htm> was part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, but in October 1994 it became a fully independent republic in free association with the United States. While the country is independent, the United States provides defense and some financial assistance, and in return is allowed military use of the islands.

The minor outlying islands which are territories of the United States include Midway Atoll <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/midwaypage.htm> (1867), Palmyra Atoll <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/palmyrapage.htm> (1898, with Hawaii), and Wake Atoll <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/wakepage.htm> (1899), Baker Island and Howland Island <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/bhpage.htm> (1857), Jarvis Island <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/jarvispage.htm> (1858), Johnston Atoll <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/johnstonpage.htm> (1858), Kingman Reef <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/kingmanpage.htm> (1922), and Navassa Island <http://www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/navassapage.htm> (1857).

The Philippines became a territory of the United States after the Spanish- American War. Under the December 10, 1898 Treaty of Paris, Spain ceded the islands to the United States for $20 million. In 1935 the Philippines became a self-governing commonwealth. Japan took over the Philippines from 1942-1944, but the United States regained the islands in 1945, and full independence was granted in July, 1946.

  1. How should this data set be cited?

    National Atlas of the United States, 200506, Territorial Acquisitions of the United States: National Atlas of the United States, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: 170
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -64
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 72
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 17

  3. What does it look like?

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Calendar_Date: 2005
    Currentness_Reference: Ground condition

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

      Indirect_Spatial_Reference:
      U.S. Department of Commerce, 1987, Codes for the Identification of the States, the District of Columbia and the Outlying Areas of the United States, and Associated Areas (FIPS 5-2): Washington, DC, National Institute of Standards and Technology.

      This is a Vector data set. It contains the following vector data types (SDTS terminology):
      • GT-polygon composed of chains (2834)

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

      Horizontal positions are specified in geographic coordinates, that is, latitude and longitude. Latitudes are given to the nearest 0.000278. Longitudes are given to the nearest 0.000278. Latitude and longitude values are specified in Decimal degrees.

      The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1983.
      The ellipsoid used is GRS1980.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378137.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/298.257222.

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?

    Territorial area (described by Usacqup020.dbf)
    An area of territory acquired by the United States of America. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Shape
    The representation of the entity in the data. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    Polygon2-dimensional element

    Area
    The size of the shape in square coverage units. In the distributed file, coverage units represent square decimal degrees. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.000
    Maximum:267.35422

    Perimeter
    The perimeter of shape in coverage units. In the distributed file, coverage units represent decimal degrees. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.00962
    Maximum:374.68023

    Usacqup020
    Internal feature number. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Range of values
    Minimum:2
    Maximum:2835

    Date
    The date(s) of the acquisition of the territory, or the date when the territory was ceded to another country. This refers to the date when a treaty was signed or when another form of agreement occurred. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Range of values
    Minimum:1783
    Maximum:1917

    Name
    The name(s) of the acquisition. The date of the treaty or other form of agreement is included. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    There is no predefined set of valid acquisition names.

    Notes
    A brief note about the territorial acquisition. It includes the name of the treaty or the form of agreement. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    There is no predefined set of valid acquisition notes.

    Water
    An indication of whether the territory is water or land. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    0The area is land.
    1The area is water.


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

    • National Atlas of the United States

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    Gita Urban-Mathieux
    National Atlas of the United States
    12201 Sunrise Valley Dr
    Reston, VA 20192

    703-648-5175 (voice)
    atlasmail@usgs.gov


Why was the data set created?

These data are intended for geographic display and analysis at the national level, and for large regional areas. The data should be displayed and analyzed at scales appropriate for 1:2,000,000-scale data. No responsibility is assumed by the National Atlas of the United States in the use of these data.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

    ATLAS-Streams (source 1 of 7)
    National Atlas of the United States, 200301, Streams and Waterbodies of the United States: National Atlas of the United States, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 2000000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial information

    ATLAS-HUC (source 2 of 7)
    National Atlas of the United States, 200211, 1:2,000,000-Scale Hydrologic Unit Boundaries: National Atlas of the United States, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 2000000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial information

    ATLAS-States (source 3 of 7)
    National Atlas of the United States, 200506, State Boundaries of the United States: National Atlas of the United States, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 2000000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial information

    Canada-HUC (source 4 of 7)
    Government of Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Canada Centre, 2003, Drainage Areas: Government of Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, The Atlas of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

    Online Links:

    Type_of_Source_Media: Online
    Source_Contribution: Spatial information

    PLSS_Map (source 5 of 7)
    U.S. Geological Survey, 1978, United States of America Showing the Extent of Public Lands Surveys: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 3168000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Boundary_Booklet (source 6 of 7)
    U.S. Geological Survey, 1976, Boundaries of the United States and the Several States: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Booklet
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Territorial_Expansion (source 7 of 7)
    Ellis, Melvin Y. , 200312, Territorial Expansion of the United States: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Internal text document
    Source_Contribution: Attribute and spatial information

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

    Date: Mar-2005 (process 1 of 1)
    Using the historical boundaries shown on the PLSS_Map as a guide, lines from ATLAS-States, ATLAS-HUC, ATLAS-Streams, and Canada-HUC were copied into a new GIS dataset. The polygons were labeled with information derived from the PLSS-Map, the Boundary_Booklet, and the Territorial_Expansion document.

    Data sources used in this process:

    • ATLAS-Streams
    • ATLAS-HUC
    • ATLAS-States
    • Canada-HUC
    • PLSS_Map
    • Boundary_Booklet
    • Territorial_Expansion

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?

  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?

  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?

  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?

    This map layer includes territorial acquisitions of the United States from 1783 to the present, in North America, Hawaii, and the Caribbean. Included are areas that were part of the United States at one time but which have been ceded to other countries.

  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

    The map layer was checked for topological consistency using ArcGIS software from Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. No other checks for logical consistency were performed on this map layer.


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints:
None. Acknowledgment of the National Atlas of the United States of America would be appreciated in products derived from these data.

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    Earth Science Information Center, U.S. Geological Survey
    507 National Center
    Reston, VA 20192

    1-888-ASK-USGS (1-888-275-8747) (voice)

    Contact_Instructions:
    In addition to the address above there are other ESIC offices throughout the country. A full list of these offices is at <http://geography.usgs.gov/esic/esic_index.html>.

  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    Although these data have been processed successfully on a computer system at the U.S. Geological Survey, no warranty expressed or implied is made by the U.S. Geological Survey regarding the utility of the data on any other system, nor shall the act of distribution constitute any such warranty. No responsibility is assumed by the U.S. Geological Survey in the use of these data.

  4. How can I download or order the data?


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 12-Apr-2005
Metadata author:
Gita Urban-Mathieux
National Atlas of the United States
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr
Reston, VA 20192

703-648-5175 (voice)
atlasmail@usgs.gov

Metadata standard:
FGDC Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)



 


Generated by mp version 2.8.16 on Wed Mar 29 16:13:41 2006