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Coal Fields of the United States

Metadata also available as - [Outline] - [Parseable text] - [XML] - [DIF]

Frequently-anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title: Coal Fields of the United States
Abstract:
This map layer shows the coal fields of Alaska and the conterminous United States. Most of the material for the conterminous United States was collected from James Trumbull's "Coal Fields of the United States, Conterminous United States" map (sheet 1, 1960). The Gulf Coast region was updated using generalized, coal-bearing geology obtained from State geologic maps. The Alaska coal fields were collected from Farrell Barnes's "Coal Fields of the United States, Alaska" map (sheet 2, 1961).
  1. How should this data set be cited?

    USGS; Eastern Energy Team; John Tully (comp.), 200108, Coal Fields of the United States: National Atlas of the United States, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -176.000
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -66.000
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 70.981
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 26.000

  3. What does it look like?

    <http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1996/of96-092/Comp/main.gif> (GIF)
    This is a simplified GIF image of the coal fields in the conterminous United States.

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Calendar_Date: Aug-2001
    Currentness_Reference: Publication date

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

      Horizontal positions are specified in geographic coordinates, that is, latitude and longitude. Latitudes are given to the nearest 0.001. Longitudes are given to the nearest 0.001. Latitude and longitude values are specified in Decimal degrees.

      The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1983.
      The ellipsoid used is GRS1980.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378137.0.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/298.257222.

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?

    Coal fields (described by coalfdp050.dbf)
    An area underlain by coal-bearing rocks. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Shape
    The representation of the entity in the data. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    Polygon2-dimensional element

    Area
    The size of the shape in square coverage units. In the distributed file, coverage units represent square decimal degrees. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Range of values
    Minimum:580104.500
    Maximum:270722121728

    Perimeter
    The perimeter of shape in coverage units. In the distributed file, coverage units represent decimal degrees. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Range of values
    Minimum:3617.981
    Maximum:10878455.000

    Coalfdp050
    Internal feature number (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Range of values
    Minimum:2
    Maximum:994

    Max_rank
    A unique code that indicates the maximum rank of coal within the field or part of a coal region. (Source: Trumbull, 1960, Coal Fields of the United States (Sheet 1): U.S. Geological Survey Map, 1:5000000. Barnes, 1961, Coal Fields of the United States (Sheet 2 - Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Map, 1:500000.)

    ValueDefinition
    0An internal polygon where no coal is present.
    20Anthracite coal that is potentially minable.
    25Anthracite coal of other potential uses.
    30Sub-bituminous coal that is potentially minable.
    35Sub-bituminous coal of other potential uses.
    40Low-volatile bituminous coal that is potentially minable.
    45Low-volatile bituminous coal of other potential uses.
    50Lignite coal that is potentially minable.
    55Lignite coal of other potential uses.
    60Medium and high volatile bituminous coal that is potentially minable.
    65Medium and high volatile bituminous coal of other potential uses.

    Description
    A description of the maximum rank, denoting potential minability and other potential uses. (Source: Trumbull, 1960, Coal Fields of the United States (Sheet 1): U.S. Geological Survey Map, 1:5000000. Barnes, 1961, Coal Fields of the United States (Sheet 2 - Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Map, 1:500000.)

    ValueDefinition
    NO COAL / INTERNAL POLYGONNon-coal area within a coal field.
    Anthracite / potentially minableAnthracite is highly metamorphosed coal in which fixed carbon content is between 92% and 98% (on a dry, mineral-matter-free basis). It is hard and black, with a semimetallic luster and a semiconchoidal fracture. Can include meta-anthracite and semianthracite in this data set. Sufficient data exist to define these known coal areas.
    Anthracite / other usesAnthracite is highly metamorphosed coal in which fixed carbon content is between 92% and 98% (on a dry, mineral-matter-free basis). It is hard and black, with a semimetallic luster and a semiconchoidal fracture. Can include meta-anthracite and semianthracite in this data set. Information on coal is meager or coals may be thin or of poor quality. Potential uses may include carbon dioxide sequestration, in-situ gasification, and coalbed methane production.
    Low Volatile Bituminous / potentially minableLow volatile bituminous coal has a fixed carbon content equal to or greater than 78% and less than 86% and a volatile matter content greater than 14% and less than or equal to 22% (on a dry, mineral- matter-free basis). Sufficient data exist to define these known coal areas.
    Low Volatile Bituminous / other usesLow volatile bituminous coal has a fixed carbon content equal to or greater than 78% and less than 86% and a volatile matter content greater than 14% and less than or equal to 22% (on a dry, mineral- matter-free basis). Information on coal is meager or coals may be thin or of poor quality. Potential uses include carbon dioxide sequestration, in-situ gasification, and coalbed methane production.
    Medium and High Volatile Bituminous / potentially minableMedium volatile bituminous coal has a fixed carbon content equal to or greater than 69% and less than 78% and a volatile matter content greater than 22% and less than or equal to 31% (on a dry, mineral- matter-free basis). High volatile bituminous coal has less than 69% fixed carbon and greater than 31% volatile matter (on a dry, mineral-matter-free basis). Sufficient data exist to define these known coal areas.
    Medium and High Volatile Bituminous / other usesMedium volatile bituminous coal has a fixed carbon content equal to or greater than 69% and less than 78% and a volatile matter content greater than 22% and less than or equal to 31% (on a dry, mineral- matter-free basis). High volatile bituminous coal has less than 69% fixed carbon and greater than 31% volatile matter (on a dry, mineral-matter-free basis). Information on coal is meager or coals may be thin or of poor quality. Potential uses include carbon dioxide sequestration, in-situ gasification, and coalbed methane production.
    Subbituminous / potentially minableSubbituminous coal has gross calorific values less than 11,500 British thermal units per pound but greater than 8,300 British thermal units per pound (on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis). It is intermediate in rank between lignite and bituminous coal. Sufficient data exist to define these known coal areas.
    Subbituminous / other usesSubbituminous coal has gross calorific values less than 11,500 British thermal units per pound but greater than 8,300 British thermal units per pound (on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis). It is intermediate in rank between lignite and bituminous coal. Information on coal is meager or coals may be thin or of poor quality. Potential uses include carbon dioxide sequestration, in-situ gasification, and coalbed methane production.
    Lignite / potentially minableLignite coal has gross calorific values less than 8,300 British thermal units per pound (on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis). It is the lowest rank of consolidated coal, usually brownish-black in color. Sufficient data exist to define these known coal areas.
    Lignite / other usesLignite coal has gross calorific values less than 8,300 British thermal units per pound (on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis). It is the lowest rank of consolidated coal, usually brownish-black in color. Information on coal is meager or coals may be thin or of poor quality. Potential uses include carbon dioxide sequestration, in-situ gasification, and coalbed methane production.

    Province
    The name of the coal province in which the field occurs. (Source: Trumbull, 1960, Coal Fields of the United States (Sheet 1): U.S. Geological Survey Map, 1:5000000. Barnes, 1961, Coal Fields of the United States (Sheet 2 - Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Map, 1:500000.)

    ValueDefinition
    AlaskaProvince includes coal fields in Alaska.
    EasternProvince includes coal fields along U.S. eastern seaboard.
    GulfProvince includes coal fields along U.S. Gulf Coastal region.
    InteriorProvince includes coal fields in the central U.S.
    Northern Great PlainsProvince includes coal fields in the Northern Great Plains area between the Rocky Mountain and Interior coal provinces.
    Pacific CoastProvince includes coal fields along U.S. western seaboard.
    Rocky MountainProvince includes coal fields in the Rocky Mountain region between Canadian and Mexican borders.

    Name
    The name of the coal field or region. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    <blank>The area has no coal field or region name in the sources.
    Appalachian RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia in the Appalachian Mountains.
    Atlantic Coast RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia.
    Bering River FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Alaska near the Bering River.
    Big Horn Basin RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Montana and Wyoming around the Big Horn Basin.
    Black Hills RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of South Dakota and Wyoming around the Black Hills.
    Black Mesa FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of northeastern Arizona near Black Mesa.
    Blackfeet-Valier RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of northwestern Montana.
    Broad Pass FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Alaska near Broad Pass.
    Bull Mountain FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Montana around Bull Mountain.
    Canon City FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Colorado around Canon City.
    Carthage FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central New Mexico around Carthage.
    Centralia-Chehalis FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Washington around Centralia and Chehalis.
    Cerrillos FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of north central New Mexico around Cerrillos.
    Chicago Creek FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Alaska near Chicago Creek.
    Chignik FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Alaska near Chignik.
    Coaldale FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of western Nevada around Coaldale.
    Coos Bay FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Oregon around Coos Bay.
    Cretaceous Lignite AreaThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Kansas.
    Datil Mountains FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of western New Mexico near the Datil Mountains.
    Deer Creek FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southeastern Arizona.
    Denver RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Colorado around Denver.
    Eagle FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of eastern Alaska near the town of Eagle.
    Eagle Pass FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Texas near the town of Eagle Pass.
    Eagle Springs FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of western Texas.
    Eastern RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, and Missouri.
    Eden Ridge FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Oregon near Eden Ridge.
    Electric FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Montana and Wyoming near the town of Electric.
    Engle FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern New Mexico near the town of Engle.
    Fort Union RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming around Fort Union.
    Garfield County FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of east central Montana in Garfield County.
    Glacier FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of northwestern Washington near the town of Glacier.
    Goose Creek FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Idaho, Nevada, and Utah near the Goose Creek Mountains.
    Goshen Hole FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Nebraska and Wyoming near Goshen Hole.
    Great Falls FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Montana near Great Falls.
    Green River RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.
    Hams Fork RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming.
    Hanna FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of south central Wyoming near the town of Hanna.
    Henry Mountains FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southern Utah near the Henry Mountains.
    Herendeen Bay FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Alaska near Herendeen Bay.
    Horseshoe Bend FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Idaho near the town of Horseshoe Bend.
    Ione FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central California near the town of Ione.
    Jackson Hole FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Wyoming near Jackson Hole.
    Jarvis Creek FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of eastern Alaska near Jarvis Creek.
    Jornada del Muerto FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central New Mexico.
    Kelso-Castle Rock AreaThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Washington near the towns of Kelso and Castle Rock.
    Kenai FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southern Alaska around Kenai.
    Kobuk FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of northwestern Alaska near the town of Kobuk.
    Lewistown FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Montana near Lewistown.
    Livingston-Trail Creek FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Montana near Livingston and Trail Creek.
    Lombard FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Montana near Lombard.
    Matanuska FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southern Alaska near Matanuska.
    Mississippi RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee.
    Missoula FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of western Montana near Missoula.
    Monero FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of northern New Mexico near Monero.
    Nenana FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Alaska near Nenana.
    North Central FieldsThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of north central Pennsylvania.
    North Park FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of northern Colorado near North Park.
    North-Central RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of north central Montana.
    Northern Alaska FieldsThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of northern Alaska.
    Northern RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Michigan.
    Orofino FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Idaho near the town of Orofino.
    Pagosa Springs FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of south central Colorado near Pagosa Springs.
    Pennsylvania Anthracite RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of eastern Pennsylvania.
    Pinedale FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of eastern Arizona near the town of Pinedale.
    Powder River RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Montana and Wyoming around the Powder River.
    Rampart FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Alaska near the town of Rampart.
    Raton Mesa RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Colorado and New Mexico near the town of Raton, New Mexico.
    Rhode Island Meta-Anthracite RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.
    Rio Puerco FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of northwestern New Mexico.
    Rock Creek FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southeastern Wyoming.
    Roslyn Cleelum FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Washington.
    San Carlos FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of western Texas.
    San Juan River RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah around the San Juan River.
    Santo Tomas FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southern Texas around the town of Santo Tomas.
    Sierra Blanca FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of south central New Mexico.
    Skagit County AreaThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of western Washington in Skagit County.
    South Park FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Colorado.
    Southwestern RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Texas.
    Southwestern Utah RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Utah.
    Stillwater FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southern Montana in Stillwater County.
    Stone Canyon FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central California.
    Summit Creek FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of western Washington.
    Susitna FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southern Alaska near the town of Susitna.
    Terlingua FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Texas near the town of Terlingua.
    Tertiary Lake Beds RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of western Montana.
    Texas RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas.
    Tijeras FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central New Mexico near the town of Tijeras.
    Tongue Mesa FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Colorado.
    Uinta RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Colorado and Utah.
    Una del Gato FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central New Mexico.
    Unga Island FieldThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of southwestern Alaska near Unga Island.
    Western RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Oklahoma.
    Whatcom County AreaThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of western Washington in Whatcom County.
    Wind River RegionThe name given to the area, underlain by coal-bearing strata, which includes portions of central Wyoming.


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

    • USGS; Eastern Energy Team; John Tully (comp.)

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    Susan J. Tewalt
    956 National Center
    Reston, Virginia 20192
    USA

    703-648-6437 (voice)


Why was the data set created?

These data are intended for geographic display and analysis at the National level, and for large regional areas. The data should be displayed and analyzed at scales appropriate for 1:5,000,000-scale data. No responsibility is assumed by the U.S. Geological Survey or the National Atlas of the United States in the use of these data.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

    CF1908 (source 1 of 18)
    Campbell, M.R., 1908, Coal Fields of the United States: U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, DC.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 7500000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    CF1942 (source 2 of 18)
    Averitt, P., 1942, Coal Fields of the United States: U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, DC.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 2500000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    CF1960 (source 3 of 18)
    Trumbull, J., 1960, Coal Fields of the United States, sheet 1: U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, DC.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 5000000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    CF1961 (source 4 of 18)
    Barnes, F.F., 1961, Coal Fields of the United States, sheet 2: U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, DC.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 5000000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Coal88 (source 5 of 18)
    Wood, Jr., G.H., and Bour, III, W.V., 1988, Coal Map of North America, south sheet: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 5000000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Missouri (source 6 of 18)
    Survey, Missouri Geological , 1979, Geologic Map of Missouri.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Mississippi (source 7 of 18)
    Society, Mississippi Geological , and U.S. Geological Survey, 1945, Geologic Map of Mississippi.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Louisiana (source 8 of 18)
    Survey, Louisiana Geological , 1984, Geologic Map of Louisiana.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Arkansas (source 9 of 18)
    Commission, Arkansas Geological , and U.S. Geological Survey, 1976, Geologic Map of Arkansas.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Texas (source 10 of 18)
    Texas Bureau of Economic Geology, 1992, Geologic Map of Texas.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Georgia (source 11 of 18)
    Georgia Department of Natural Resources, and Survey, Georgia Geological , 1975, Geologic Map of Georgia.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Kentucky (source 12 of 18)
    Survey, Kentucky Geological , and U.S. Geological Survey, 1981, Geologic Map of Kentucky.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 250000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Tennessee (source 13 of 18)
    Tennessee Department of Conserv, Division of Geology, 1966, Geologic Map of Tennessee.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 250000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    Alabama (source 14 of 18)
    Geological Survey of Alabama, 1989, Geologic Map of Alabama.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    CFALL (source 15 of 18)
    U.S. Geological Survey, 1995, Coal Fields Data Set: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 5000000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    CFNEW (source 16 of 18)
    U.S. Geological Survey, 2001, Coal Fields Data Set: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 5000000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

    KEYSTONE (source 17 of 18)
    Corporation, Intertec Publishing , 2000, Keystone Coal Industry Manual: Intertec Publishing Corporation, Chicago, Illinois.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Book
    Source_Contribution: Attribute information

    ATLASHY (source 18 of 18)
    National Atlas of the United States, 1999, Hydrography Features of the United States: National Atlas of the United States, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: Online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 2000000
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

    Date: 1995 (process 1 of 4)
    All the paper maps were manually digitized on a tablet using Arc/INFO. All data were then appended into one data set. This data set was edited to resolve inconsistencies between maps and to form a polygon coverage. The final data set was then attributed using the coaltype codes described within this document.

    Data sources used in this process:

    • CF1908
    • CF1942
    • CF1960
    • CF1961
    • Coal88
    • Missouri
    • Mississippi
    • Louisiana
    • Arkansas
    • Texas
    • Georgia
    • Kentucky
    • Tennessee
    • Alabama

    Data sources produced in this process:

    • CFALL

    Date: 2001 (process 2 of 4)
    Some arcs in Alaska, Florida, Michigan, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, and Washington were adjusted to align with the National Atlas shoreline.

    Data sources used in this process:

    • CFALL
    • ATLASHY

    Data sources produced in this process:

    • CFNEW

    Date: 2001 (process 3 of 4)
    Coal province and coal field/region name attributes were added to polygons based on the CF1960 and CF1961 maps. One additional name was obtained from State coal field summaries in KEYSTONE.

    Data sources used in this process:

    • CF1960
    • CF1961
    • KEYSTONE
    • CFNEW

    Date: 2001 (process 4 of 4)
    The polygon coverage was converted to a shapefile.

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?

  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?

  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?

  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?

    This map layer is a representation of the coal fields in the conterminous United States and Alaska. There are no coal fields in Hawaii.

  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

    Topology for this map layer was built using the CLEAN command within Arc/INFO. This command eliminates dangling nodes, calculates intersections of arcs, eliminates redundant arcs, and creates a polygon attribute table.


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints:
None. Acknowledgement of the National Atlas of the United States of America would be appreciated in products derived from these data.

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    Susan J. Tewalt
    MS 956 National Center
    Reston, Virginia 20192
    USA

    703-648-6437 (voice)

  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    Although these data have been processed successfully on a computer system at the U.S. Geological Survey, no warranty expressed or implied is made by the U.S. Geological Survey regarding the utility of the data on any other system, nor shall the act of distribution constitute any such warranty. No responsibility is assumed by the U.S. Geological Survey in the use of these data.

    Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  4. How can I download or order the data?


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 20-Jun-2006
Metadata author:
Peg Rawson
National Atlas of the United States
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr
Reston, VA 20192

703-648-4183 (voice)
atlasmail@usgs.gov

Metadata standard:
FGDC Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)



 


Generated by mp version 2.9.1 on Mon Aug 21 14:55:44 2006